“Almost, Maine” is almost, perfect

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“Almost, Maine” is almost, perfect

Photo by Sofia Suardi

Photo by Sofia Suardi

Photo by Sofia Suardi

Grace Kowal

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I walked into “Almost, Maine” with tears in my eyes. I had choked on flaming hot Cheetos while waiting in line (getting a concerned look from Mr. Shea), because what better way to pass time than inflicting pain upon your tongue? As I looked around for a seat, the glistening snowy set made me smile. Only Wilson can so consistently be spot-on with their sets every time, and the simple, yet nostalgic design for “Almost, Maine” was no different.

The roughly 90-minute show was broken into nine mini-skits, each with a unique story and a different take on love. Three in particular stood out to me, although all were well-written and excellently acted. The first, “Her Heart,” starring Ayomi Wolff and Augusten Toughey, was full of spot-on symbolism, and laced with humor. Another, called “They Fell,” was relatable, cute, and 100 percent believable. Played by Virginia Suardi and Nikki Keating, it tells the story of two best friends who fall in love with each other after lamenting about the ridiculously horrible dates they’ve been on with men.

The last vignette that stood out to me was perhaps the most realistic, yet tragic, one. Titled “Where it Went,” it depicts a husband (William Wright) who seems too preoccupied with work to pay attention to his wife (Layla Behbehani). The tension of their relationship mounts after their miserable ice skating date, and a major fight ensues. The husband accuses his wife of being a liar, and she points out to him that he forgot that it was their anniversary. They are both exhausted, worn down, and wondering where their love has gone, hence the title “Where it Went.” By the climax of their fight, the wife’s shoe (which the couple is looking for throughout the fight), falls from the ceiling, and the lights go dark.

“Where it Went” demonstrates the sarcastic yet piercingly accurate commentary on love that is found throughout the show. Each skit played the audience’s emotions differently, and by the end of “Almost, Maine,” I had tears in my eyes once more.