The Wilson Beacon

The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

Back to Article
Back to Article

The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

Photo by Aidan Fogarty

Photo by Aidan Fogarty

Photo by Aidan Fogarty

Aaron Rosenthal

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






When I broke my wrist during the Jelleff basketball championship in early March, there were a number of thoughts racing through my head: (1) I don’t think I’ve ever jumped that high before, (2) I hope we don’t lose this game, (3) I shouldn’t care this much about rec basketball, and (4) I might have to miss my last season playing baseball. Even though spectators confirmed that my leaping abilities were impressive, we ended up losing the game, and the injury ultimately kept me sidelined for over a month.

Fortunately, I was able to make it back in time for many of our team’s competitive games, as our schedule was front-loaded with DCPS opponents.

These games aren’t fun for anyone. We usually win by over 20 runs in three innings. Opposing players usually end up cursing each other out as we repeatedly circle the bases. When any of our teammates get out, the dugout erupts with laughter and cheers. After an hour and a half has elapsed, we end the games by bunting and jogging to first base, waiting to be thrown out. It’s sad. And it feels like a total waste of time. But it’s not.

In past seasons, I have occupied the brain-numbing hour and a half at each game either by mindlessly playing or by practicing on the side. This year, I had the opportunity to just watch. Most times, I was bored out of my mind. But every so often, there were little things I noticed that made me realize the importance of playing in these games.

When we played H.D. Woodson, their catcher continued to uplift his teammates throughout the entire game. Despite getting blown out, a smile never left his face.

Against Ron Brown, I filled in as our team’s first base coach. Even when they were down by 20 runs, their first basemen kindly greeted every one of our players. Several times, he expressed that one day, their team would be like ours.

Roosevelt shocked us by beginning the game with back-to-back hits. Their dugout was arguably louder than ours has ever been.

During every DCPS game we play, there is evidence that at least one player on the other team genuinely wants to be there. That matters.

Wilson has won 26 straight DCIAA championships. We haven’t lost a DCPS game since the 90’s. But this doesn’t mean that things can’t change. In fact, the city’s Little League scene provides evidence that a shift could already be underway.

Mamie Johnson, an all-Black team from Ward 7, won the District championship last summer. The tournament has been held annually for 31 years. This was the first time that it hadn’t been won by either Capitol City or Northwest, two predominantly white leagues in Wards 3 and 4. When I played for Capitol City in 2012 and 2013, we routinely mercy-ruled teams from all other parts of the city. Against the teams from Wards 7 and 8, we would win by upwards of 30 runs.

In DC’s majority-Black areas, America’s pastime has long been an afterthought. Hopefully, Mamie Johnson’s victory is a sign that the culture surrounding baseball in the District is finally beginning to transform.

Regardless of how much of an inconvenience DCPS games feel like, the glimmers of hope I’ve witnessed demonstrate why they are a necessary investment of time and energy. When I was 12, no part of me could have ever imagined a team from Ward 7 winning the championship. And right now, the thought of losing our DCIAA streak seems impossible. But it’s not. To echo the sentiments of my head coach, nothing would make me happier than watching Wilson walk off the field as a team like Woodson or Ron Brown or Roosevelt gets to raise a trophy of their own.

About the Writer
Aaron Rosenthal, Written Content Editor

Senior. Third year writing for The Beacon. Aspiring professional basketball player.

 

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    AOTM: Autumn Young

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    Why Nats fans should still root for Bryce Harper

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    Minor setback for a major comeback: Tigers share their experiences with injuries

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    Attagirl: Paloma Benach steps up to the plate

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    Running up a bill: Tenley Tiger Run

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    Who’s in those shoes?

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    Wilson tennis hopes to serve up wins

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    Behind the Madness: how Wilson picks brackets

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    Guiding the grind: Sports philosophy at Wilson

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    Who’s in those shoes? Chad Rockingham

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    Krispy Kash: Making dough from donuts

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    #RUNTHISTOWN follows Wilson basketball’s rise

  • Sports

    Photo Gallery: Wilson vs. Sidwell in the DCSAA Championship

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    Beyond the track: what it takes to be a Wilson runner

  • Sports

    New year, new Nadira Ricks

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    Kicking with Reese Hinkle

  • Sports

    Athletic department scrambles to find coaches

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    Wear and tear brings locker room despair

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    Wilson flag football hopes to secure DCIAA title

  • The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball

    Sports

    AOTM – Adam Friedman

Navigate Right
The Student News Site of Woodrow Wilson Senior High School
The hidden beauty of DCPS baseball